Yogalicious | stanton-company.com


Yogalicious

Cooking clean and eating mindfully help instructor Kathryn Budig maintain her enviable physique. Here, she shares a few of her go-to recipes.

I credit Kathryn with helping me regain my waistline after giving birth to Jade, and having done a few hundred downward dogs and savasanas together, we’ve become fast friends. Like many yogis, she considers diet an essential part of living healthfully and well, and loves to experiment in the kitchen. I asked her about her food philosophy and which foods she can’t say no to.

Giada: What does mindful eating mean to you?

Kathryn Budig: Eating mindfully is about respecting your body and your environment. The are so many delicious foods out there and it’s easy to go crazy trying them all. Pay attention to what makes your body come alive and what makes it crumple. In addition, as often as possible, be aware of where your food comes from. Try to support local farmers and look for humanely raised, free-range, grass-fed meats if you go that route.

GDL: Do you find the act of cooking itself to be a relaxing, meditative process?

KB: Without a doubt! Cooking is incredibly cathartic for me after a long day. And cooking for someone is the ultimate way to say, “I love you” in my world. Some of my fondest memories come from the flavors and laughter surrounding a dinner table.

GDL: What kind of food do you find is most supportive of your yoga practice?

KB: Clean, organic, and non-processed. It’s really difficult to eat something heavy and creamy then try to go upside-down and twist! I’m not saying you can’t indulge from time to time, but a constant yoga practice will make you want to clean up your eating habits so you can get the most out of your time on the mat.

GDL: Have you always enjoyed cooking? Who are your big culinary influences?

KB: My mother was a pasta with canned sauce sort of cook, so I really didn’t learn much about cooking until I was in high school. My boyfriend’s parents were amazing chefs, and I would shadow them in the kitchen and learn as much as I could. Next thing you know I’m the only person among my college friends that knew anything about cooking, so I became the “Italian mama.” As for culinary influences—that’s you, Giada! We’ve spent countless yoga sessions discussing food, recipes, what to serve on a first date. You’re the best. I also really admire Jamie Oliver and dig smoothie goddess Julie Morris.

GDL: Is there such a thing as “yoga cuisine”? Are you a follower of Ayurvedic principles?

KB: Every yogi is different. There are raw, vegan, vegetarian, and yes, even omnivore (like myself). I find that yogis, regardless of their food principles, all tend to be very aware of where their food comes from (local farmers, organic produce, nonprocessed) and encourage people to think before they dive into the big chew. I don’t strictly follow an Ayurevedic diet but draw quite a bit of inspiration from it. My doctor, Debbie Kim, keeps me educated, inspired, and honest. I’m so grateful to healers like her.

GDL: Everyone wants a lean, strong yoga body like yours. How much of that is due to your practice and how much is diet? Can either one alone help you get there?

KB: They go hand-in-hand without a doubt. Eating clean is very important, but making time to move your body completes the puzzle and vice versa. I try to keep my body moving for at least a bit every day. It not only makes me feel physically confident, but it does wonders for my stress levels and my mind. When I’m active and eating clean I feel my best. That being said, a good bottle of wine does the trick, too!

Giada: What does mindful eating mean to you?

Kathryn Budig: Eating mindfully is about respecting your body and your environment. The are so many delicious foods out there and it’s easy to go crazy trying them all. Pay attention to what makes your body come alive and what makes it crumple. In addition, as often as possible, be aware of where your food comes from. Try to support local farmers and look for humanely raised, free-range, grass-fed meats if you go that route.

GDL: Do you find the act of cooking itself to be a relaxing, meditative process?

KB: Without a doubt! Cooking is incredibly cathartic for me after a long day. And cooking for someone is the ultimate way to say, “I love you” in my world. Some of my fondest memories come from the flavors and laughter surrounding a dinner table.

GDL: What kind of food do you find is most supportive of your yoga practice?

KB: Clean, organic, and non-processed. It’s really difficult to eat something heavy and creamy then try to go upside-down and twist! I’m not saying you can’t indulge from time to time, but a constant yoga practice will make you want to clean up your eating habits so you can get the most out of your time on the mat.

GDL: Have you always enjoyed cooking? Who are your big culinary influences?

KB: My mother was a pasta with canned sauce sort of cook, so I really didn’t learn much about cooking until I was in high school. My boyfriend’s parents were amazing chefs, and I would shadow them in the kitchen and learn as much as I could. Next thing you know I’m the only person among my college friends that knew anything about cooking, so I became the “Italian mama.” As for culinary influences—that’s you, Giada! We’ve spent countless yoga sessions discussing food, recipes, what to serve on a first date. You’re the best. I also really admire Jamie Oliver and dig smoothie goddess Julie Morris.

GDL: Is there such a thing as “yoga cuisine”? Are you a follower of Ayurvedic principles?

KB: Every yogi is different. There are raw, vegan, vegetarian, and yes, even omnivore (like myself). I find that yogis, regardless of their food principles, all tend to be very aware of where their food comes from (local farmers, organic produce, nonprocessed) and encourage people to think before they dive into the big chew. I don’t strictly follow an Ayurevedic diet but draw quite a bit of inspiration from it. My doctor, Debbie Kim, keeps me educated, inspired, and honest. I’m so grateful to healers like her.

GDL: Everyone wants a lean, strong yoga body like yours. How much of that is due to your practice and how much is diet? Can either one alone help you get there?

KB: They go hand-in-hand without a doubt. Eating clean is very important, but making time to move your body completes the puzzle and vice versa. I try to keep my body moving for at least a bit every day. It not only makes me feel physically confident, but it does wonders for my stress levels and my mind. When I’m active and eating clean I feel my best. That being said, a good bottle of wine does the trick, too!

GDL: I notice that the recipes you’ve given us for this issue are gluten-free and dairy-free. Are you vegan? Do you avoid gluten? If so, why?

KB: I have wheat allergies and dairy intolerance. I love brown rice products (great as a gluten-free pasta and bread) and use milks like almond, rice, and/or coconut. I find that my body doesn’t get too angry if I eat raw aged cheese, so that’s my guilty dairy pleasure. I absolutely adore bread and pasta but have found amazing replacements. It’s difficult when I’m traveling but a pleasure when I’m home in my kitchen.

GDL: What are your favorite indulgences? Guilty pleasures?

KB: Pasta Bolognese is my all-time favorite—the ultimate comfort food! Honestly, any kind of pasta makes me want to give my tummy pom-poms.

GDL: What is your position on fasting? Some people say it helps clear the mind, but others say it is counterproductive. Thoughts?

KB: I have heard so many different theories on this. I personally haven’t had good experiences fasting, but that could just be my body. I do believe in cleansing once or twice a year. That being said, I cleanse with very specific foods as opposed to nothing or just juice. I think it’s important that everyone listens to their body and what it needs.

GDL: Any tips for people who might want to lose a few pounds?

KB: Cut out the processed food and sugars! Let your main liquid be water (soda and sugary drinks will really get you) and drink a ton of it. That in itself makes a huge difference. Easy with the portions as well. Try not to wait to eat until you’re starving because you’ll end up stuffing your face. Pace yourself throughout the day.
To check out Kathryn’s delicious recipes click here.
Source: Giada Weekly
Posted on: April 8, 2014